Definitions of health insurance terms Part-1

ASO (Administrative Services Only) – An arrangement in which an employer hires a
third party to deliver administrative services to the employer such as claims processing
and billing; the employer bears the risk for claims.
Coinsurance – A form of medical cost sharing in a health insurance plan that requires an
insured person to pay a stated percentage of medical expenses after the deductible
amount, if any, was paid.
¨ Once any deductible amount and coinsurance are paid, the insurer is responsible
for the rest of the reimbursement for covered benefits up to allowed charges: the
individual could also be responsible for any charges in excess of what the insurer
determines to be “usual, customary and reasonable”.
¨ Coinsurance rates may differ if services are received from an approved provider
(i.e., a provider with whom the insurer has a contract or an agreement specifying
payment levels and other contract requirements) or if received by providers not
on the approved list.
¨ In addition to overall coinsurance rates, rates may also differ for different types
of services.

Co-payment – A form of medical cost sharing in a health insurance plan that requires an
insured person to pay a fixed dollar amount when a medical service is received. The
insurer is responsible for the rest of the reimbursement.
¨ There may be separate co-payments for different services.
¨ Some plans require that a deductible first be met for some specific services
before a co-payment applies.

Deductible – A fixed dollar amount during the benefit period – usually a year – that an
insured person pays before the insurer starts to make payments for covered medical
services. Plans may have both per individual and family deductibles.
¨ Some plans may have separate deductibles for specific services. For example, a
plan may have a hospitalization deductible per admission.
¨ Deductibles may differ if services are received from an approved provider or if

received from providers not on the approved list.

Common Cross Browser Issues – Need to be tested

–Overlapping of Layout and Elements.
— Rendering Issues.
— Element out of Bounds or exceeding its container or not displayed.
— Inconsistency of third party plugins.
— Different Font Sizes across various browsers.
— Changing size of Elements across browsers.
— Alignment Issues.
— HTML Errors and broken pages.
— Browser Bugs Little known errors cause big problems.
— Inconsistent Popups and other message boxes across browsers.

— Page Loading time across browsers – are a few worth a mention.

Situational testing

Every organization, every system and every project is different, so every test project requires a unique approach. Situational testing offers various forms of testing and allows you to complete your testing projects flexibly, at the lowest possible cost and in the shortest possible time.

Among the forms of testing recognized within Situational testing are factory based testing, global scripting, session based testing, bug hunts, test tours and free style exploratory testing. Testers choose one or more of these test forms, depending on the organization, project and system. This way, Situational testing encourages you to approach testing in a flexible, structured and pragmatic fashion. With Situational testing you achieve better results than using a single specific approach.